MEET THE TEAM

Dr Charlotte Tye is a Lecturer and Research Fellow at King’s College London. She graduated in Experimental Psychology from the University of Bristol and completed doctoral and postdoctoral training at King’s College London. Her research focuses on characterising development in young children with rare neurogenetic conditions and epilepsy, and identifying infant precursors of later emerging neurodevelopmental conditions, such as autism and ADHD. Dr Tye has received prestigious fellowships from the Tuberous Sclerosis Association, Epilepsy Research UK and Autistica, and was awarded the Vicky H Whittemore prize in 2015 and the British Academy of Childhood Disability/Castang Foundation Fellowship in 2019. Her TSA Fellowship was bestowed with the ‘Kilmaine Family Fellowship’ title to recognize the impact her research will have for families living with TSC.

Dr. Charlotte Tye

I am a research assistant on the CoIN Study at the Department of Psychology, King’s College London. Before joining King’s, I completed a BA in Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford and was awarded a ‘Styring Junior Scholarship’ for academic excellence from The Queen’s College. I aim to pursue a career in academia with a specific interest in understanding the development and heterogeneity of common neurodevelopmental disorders (autism and ADHD) in individuals with neurogenetic syndromes.

Jessica Martin

I am an honorary research assistant working on the EDiTS and CoIN studies at the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience at King's College London. I am an undergraduate placement student from the University of Plymouth studying BSc Psychology. I have an interest in studying neurodevelopmental disorders, particularly Autism and ADHD.

Katie Robertson 

Abby Runicles is a final year medical student at St. Georges University of London, a part-time researcher at King's College London and a Psychology graduate from Loughborough University. During her undergraduate degree Abby undertook a placement with Dr. Tye at King's College London, during this time her passion for research in neurogenetic conditions and development began and has continued to flourish over time. She is now in her final year of medicine and works part-time on research focusing on the development of young children with and without rare Neuro-genetic disorders such as Tuberous Sclerosis Complex.

Abigail Runicles

©2020 by CoIN Study.